Community Eye Center and St. Lucy’s Eye Surgery Center are both committed to excellence in the medical and surgical treatment of retina, macula and vitreous diseases. Our board-certified Retinal Surgeon Dr. Sunil M. Malkani is a renowned ophthalmologist, offering state of the art treatment options to our patients in our facility for a variety of eye conditions, including:

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD)
  • Retinal Detachments and Tears
  • Macular Holes
  • Macular Edema
  • Diabetic Retinopathy
  • Epiretinal Membrane (Wrinkled Retina)
  • Choroidal Nevus (Freckle)
  • Vitreous Hemorrhages
  • Artery/Vein Occlusion
  • Central Serous Retinopathy
  • Vitreomacular Traction

 

Dr. Malkani, Board Certified Ophthalmologist & Vitreoretinal Specialist

Sunil M. Malkani, M.D., is a Retinal Surgeon specializing in the treatment of macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and other diseases of the retina.

Read More About Retina

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Torn Retina Informational Video

The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called vitreous. As we age, the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually, the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina so as the eye moves the vitreous moves away from the retina without causing problems. Sometimes though, the vitreous pulls hard enough to tear the retina. Flashes of light or floaters can appear in the field of vision.

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Torn Retina & Cryopexy

To repair a retinal tear with Cryopexy, your eye surgeon uses a special probe that applies intense cold energy to freeze the retina around the tear. This creates swelling that eventually becomes scar tissue. It is this scar tissue that seals the retina to the wall of the eye- helping to prevent the retina from detaching completely.

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Retinal Detachment and Tears

The retina is the light-sensitive area lining the back of the eye that sends signals through the optic nerve to the brain where these signals become the images that we see. The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called vitreous. As we age, the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina. So as the eye moves, the vitreous moves away from the retina without causing problems.

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Macular Holes

The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called the vitreous. As we age the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina so as the eye moves, the vitreous moves away from the macula without causing problems. In some cases, however, the vitreous sticks to the macula and is unable to pull away. As a result, the macula tissue stretches and a hole may form.

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Flashes and Floaters

Vision changes can indicate a serious problem with the tissue that lines the back of the eyeball (retina) optic nerve or blood vessels in the eye. Evaluation by an eye doctors is needed for sudden vision changes, such as:

Flashes of light (photopsia). Photopsia is brief but recurrent streaks, sparks, or flickers of light, particularly when you move your eyes or head. The flashes of light may be easier to see when you look at a dark background. The brief flashes may occur with retinal detachment.

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Diabetic Retinopathy

More than 24 million people – eight percent of the population – have diabetes. Diabetes is a form of vascular disease. Elevated levels of blood sugar over a long period of time can result in damage to the eyes blood vessels and retina, impairing vision. If left untreated, the eye’s macula can be damaged.

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Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-Related Macular Degeneration is a condition which affects the retina. At Community Eye Center, Dr. Malkani provides treatment for this condition.

Light rays enter the eye through the cornea, pupil and lens. These light rays are focused on the retina, the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The retina sends signals through the optic nerve to the brain where these signals become the images we see.

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