Cataract Surgeon Port Charlotte Florida

Dr. Eric A. Liss, MD

Dr. Eric Liss A Top Cataract Surgeon In Port Charlotte, North Port And Venice Florida Poses For His Headshot At Community Eye Center, A Full-Service Eye Care Clinic
Click Image To Request An Appointment

Board-Certified Ophthalmologist

Google
5/5

A Board-Certified Ophthalmologist, Dr. Liss provides comprehensive ophthalmic care with an interest in advanced cataract surgery, macular degeneration and inflammatory disorders of the eye.

Publishing research in the areas of retinal disease, refractive surgery, glaucoma and disorders of the ocular immune system, Dr. Liss is a recognized speaker, presenting his findings at multiple national ophthalmology conferences.

Providing a full range of superior ophthalmic care to patients, Dr. Liss considers treating patients to be his privilege; he is motivated by improving the lives of his patients. He recalls the greatest honor of his career as surgically restoring sight for a patient who became completely reliant upon the care of family members due to advanced cataracts.

Born and raised in Sarasota, FL, he is proud to call himself a native Floridian. Spending the majority of his life in Southwest Florida, he values the community and cherishes any opportunity to participate in the many local charities and causes that Community Eye Center supports.

Dr. Liss spends his free time enjoying the beautiful weather in Southwest Florida with his dog, gardening and cultivating tropical fruit.

Board Certification

AAO ( American Academy of Ophthamology) Board Certified

  • American Academy of Ophthalmology Florida Medical Association

  • Florida Society of Ophthalmology

  • Charlotte County Medical Association

Education

Residency: University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Internship: Riverside Regional Medical Center, Hampton Roads, VA

Medical School: Florida International University College of Medicine, Miami, FL (Summa Cum Laude)

Graduate: Emory University, Atlanta, GA (Public Health and Epidemiology)

Undergraduate: Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Types of Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

Types of Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information about cataract surgery lens choices on the internet. The best and most up-to-date information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor.

Community Eye Center (CEC) is ophthalmology, optometry, optical in multiple Southwest Florida locations with its own AAAHC accredited eye-only surgery center. To book a consult with one of CEC’s eye doctors or opticians, please choose from one of the following options.

Accommodative Lenses​

One cataract lens replacement option is the Accommodative Lens. This IOL is designed to move or change shape like the eye’s natural lens, allowing you to focus at different distances. 

Accommodative Toric Lenses

This IOL is designed to move or change shape like the eye’s natural lens allowing you to focus at different distances. With an accommodative IOL, most people find that they do not need glasses or contacts after surgery. However, some people may still prefer to wear glasses for long periods of reading or close work.

Multifocal Lenses With Cataracts Surgery​

This lens has focus zones, or rings that allow you to see clearly both at near or far distances. This means you can be less dependent on reading glasses.

Monofocal Lenses With Cataract Surgery​

This type of lens is designed to provide clear vision at one distance. Most people opt to have their monofocal lens set for clear distance vision.

Our Doctors

Read More About Cataracts & Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Loving Couple Who Choose To Look Into Each Others' Eyes

Types of Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information about cataract surgery lens choices on the internet. The best and most up-to-date information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor.

Community Eye Center (CEC) is ophthalmology, optometry, optical in multiple Southwest Florida locations with its own AAAHC accredited eye-only surgery center.

Read More »
Providing Excellence In Care For Patients At Community Eye Center's Eye-Only Surgery Center, Dr. Michael A. Baskind, CRNA, PhD Stands Next To A Patient In A Post Cataract Surgery Recovery Room

Recovery After Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgeries are typically quick and uneventful. An estimated 3.5 million cataract removals are performed each year in the United States. It is one of the most common surgical procedures. Numbers also show that the chance of a good outcome and improved vision after surgery are excellent.

Read More »
Voted The Best Cataract Surgeon In The Area, Dr. Spadafora Performs A Cataract Surgery On A Patient At Community Eye Center's Eye-Only Surgery Center

About Cataract Surgery

Ophthalmologists, optometrists and eye health professionals work as a team to provide comprehensive eye care at Community Eye Center (CEC). Eye specialists including, cataract, glaucoma, retina and oculoplastics as well as an accredited eye only surgery center, CEC offers the best cataract surgery options possible for positive patient outcomes. Eye doctors may be seen at any of CEC’s multiple Florida locations in Port Charlotte, North Port, and Venice.

Read More »
An Eye-Only Surgery Center, Eye Clinic and Optical Shop, Community Eye Center Offers Patients, Like The One Smiling At The Camera, With Comprehensive Eye Care Including Treatment For Macular Degeneration, Cataracts, Glaucoma And More

Financial Assistance For Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is generally covered under insurance and Medicare plans. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose to upgrade your surgery to one of our elective procedures, such as a premium lens choice, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance for cataract surgery.

Read More »

Laser-Guided Cataract Surgery

Community Eye Center performs Laser-Guided Cataract Surgery. Dr. Schaible and Dr. Spadafora conducted research with a form of YAG laser in human cataract surgery more than a decade ago for the FDA.

Read More »

Premium Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

In the past, cataract surgery used to be about preventing blindness; however, with the sophisticated advances in cataract removal, premium lens choices and ORA laser-guided cataract surgery, surgeons can return a patient’s vision to the way it was years ago.

Read More »

Mission

Play Video

Mission: I Care. Eye Care.

The mission of Community Eye Center is to provide the community of Southwest Florida quality eye care that will help our patients becomes as physically independent as possible by providing a full range of superior ophthalmic care and personal attention.

We will listen to our patients and communicate with them about their condition and treatment; we will treat them with the dignity, respect, care, concern and compassion we would expect for ourselves.

We will treat our co-workers and colleagues with respect and as professionals in the process of serving our patients.

We are committed to continuing improvement in quality through adaptation of technological advances and continuing education of physicians and staff.

Community Eye Center will be involved in clinical evaluation of state of the art technology. However, the focus will remain on quality treatment of each patient.

In conjunction with St. Lucy’s Outpatient Surgery Center and Community Eye Optical, our goal is to adequately inform our patients about their eye condition and the appropriate alternatives to preserve a lifetime of good vision.

Read More About Community Eye Center

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Diabetic Retinopathy

More than 24 million people – eight percent of the population – have diabetes. Diabetes is a form of vascular disease. Elevated levels of blood sugar over a long period of time can result in damage to the eyes blood vessels and retina, impairing vision. If left untreated, the eye’s macula can be damaged.

Diabetic retinopathy can lead to poor vision and even blindness. Most of the time, it gets worse over many years. At first, the blood vessels in the eye get weak. This can lead to blood and other liquids leaking into the retina from the blood vessels. This is called nonproliferative retinopathy. And this is the most common retinopathy. If the fluid leaks into the center of the eye, you may have blurry vision. Most people with nonproliferative retinopathy have no systems.

If blood sugar levels stay high, diabetic retinopathy will keep getting worse. New blood vessels grow on the retina. This may sound good, but these new blood vessels are weak. They can break open very easily, even while sleeping. If they break open, blood can leak into the middle part of the eye in front of the retina and change the vision. This bleeding can also cause scar tissue to form. Sometimes people don’t have symptoms until it is too late to treat them. This is why having eye exams regularly is so important.

When problems are detected early, a simple laser procedure can seal up leaky blood vessels in the eye.

Read More About Retina

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Torn Retina Informational Video

The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called vitreous. As we age, the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually, the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina so as the eye moves the vitreous moves away from the retina without causing problems. Sometimes though, the vitreous pulls hard enough to tear the retina. Flashes of light or floaters can appear in the field of vision.

Read More »

Torn Retina & Cryopexy

To repair a retinal tear with Cryopexy, your eye surgeon uses a special probe that applies intense cold energy to freeze the retina around the tear. This creates swelling that eventually becomes scar tissue. It is this scar tissue that seals the retina to the wall of the eye- helping to prevent the retina from detaching completely.

Read More »

Retinal Detachment and Tears

The retina is the light-sensitive area lining the back of the eye that sends signals through the optic nerve to the brain where these signals become the images that we see. The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called vitreous. As we age, the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina. So as the eye moves, the vitreous moves away from the retina without causing problems.

Read More »

Macular Holes

The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called the vitreous. As we age the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina so as the eye moves, the vitreous moves away from the macula without causing problems. In some cases, however, the vitreous sticks to the macula and is unable to pull away. As a result, the macula tissue stretches and a hole may form.

Read More »

Flashes and Floaters

Vision changes can indicate a serious problem with the tissue that lines the back of the eyeball (retina) optic nerve or blood vessels in the eye. Evaluation by an eye doctors is needed for sudden vision changes, such as:

Flashes of light (photopsia). Photopsia is brief but recurrent streaks, sparks, or flickers of light, particularly when you move your eyes or head. The flashes of light may be easier to see when you look at a dark background. The brief flashes may occur with retinal detachment.

Read More »

Diabetic Retinopathy

More than 24 million people – eight percent of the population – have diabetes. Diabetes is a form of vascular disease. Elevated levels of blood sugar over a long period of time can result in damage to the eyes blood vessels and retina, impairing vision. If left untreated, the eye’s macula can be damaged.

Read More »

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-Related Macular Degeneration is a condition which affects the retina.

Light rays enter the eye through the cornea, pupil and lens. These light rays are focused on the retina, the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The retina sends signals through the optic nerve to the brain where these signals become the images we see.

Read More »

Blocked Tear Ducts and Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Surgery

Play Video

What is a blocked tear duct and how is it treated?

When you blink, a tear film spreads over the eye making the surface smooth and clear. The tear film is made up of three distinct layers. An oily layer, a watery layer and a mucous layer. Each layer is needed for the tear film to keep our eyes moist.

Tears protect the eyes and keep them moist and healthy. Tears come from the conjunctiva which is the clear tissue over the white of the eye, and from the lacrimal glands. These glands are located above each eye. The tears flow across the surface of your eye and drain through tiny holes called puncta. Puncta are in the corners of your upper and lower eyelids near the nose. The tears then travel through tiny passages in the eyelids. They eventually go into the nasal lacrimal duct before emptying into your nose; this is why your nose runs when you cry. When the tear drainage system is either partly or completely blocked, tears cannot drain normally. The eye becomes watery and irritated it can also be constantly infected.

A blocked tear duct can be due to:
  • Age
  • Injury
  • Infection
There are many treatment options for blocked tear ducts including:
  • Antibiotics
  • Massage
  • Tear Duct Probing and Flushing
  • Balloon Catheter Dilation
  • Stenting and Intubation
  • External and Endoscopic DCR

DCR Options for Blocked Tear Ducts

Commonly performed to treat blocked tear ducts, Community Eye Center offers dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)  surgery options. DCR is a procedure which opens the passageway for tears to drain properly out of the nose again. Patients are provided with general anesthesia or local anesthesia if the procedure is performed in an outpatient setting.

External Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)

External DCR is surgery that creates a new pathway for tears to drain from the eye when the tear duct is blocked. The surgeon will make a small incision near the inside corner of the eye. He or she will then create a new opening directly from the eye’s lacrimal sack into the nasal cavity to allow tears to drain. A surgical adhesive or stitches are used to close the incision and a tubelike stent may be used temporarily to keep the new drain from closing up while healing. The tube can be removed later in the physician’s office or outpatient surgery center.

Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)

Endoscopic DCR surgically creates a new pathway for tears to drain from the eye when the tear duct is blocked. The surgeon will insert a slender tube called an endoscope into your nasal cavity. He or she will then create a new opening directly from the eyes lacrimal sack into the nasal cavity to allow tears to drain. A flexible tube called a stent may be put in place temporarily to keep the new drain from closing up while healing. The tube can be removed later in the physician’s office or outpatient surgery center.

Community Eye Center offers treatment options for blocked tear ducts, including External and Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR).

Community Eye Center Oculoplastic Surgeon, Dr. Mishra

A talented and sought-after licensed Cosmetic and Oculoplastic Surgeon with board certification in Anti-aging Medicine. Dr. Mishra offers a comprehensive array of treatments, including cosmetic and functional eyelid surgery, BOTOX, cosmetic and other options at Community Eye Center.

Read More About Oculoplastics & Cosmetics

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Photo Of Woman Wearing Glasses With Blue Frames

Financing For Cosmetic, Oculoplastics and Eyelid Surgery

Many private health insurance plans will cover the cost of functional eyelid surgery; this procedure may also be covered under Medicare. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose an elective procedure, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance.

Read More »
Person On Operating Table At Community Eye Center's St. Lucy Eye Surgery Center, Smiling With Nurses Standing Nearby To Review

Entropion & Ectropion Repair

Community Eye Center offers Southwest Florida with the best oculoplastic, cosmetic and plastic surgery, including treatment of common eyelid malposition, entropion and ectropion repair.

Read More »
Photo Of A Woman With Blonde Eye Brows Holding Her Fingers To Her Eyes To Simulate An Eye Lift Procedure

Cosmetic Treatments, Oculofacial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Community Eye Center offers oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery options for patients with cosmetic, functional or reconstructive surgery needs. Our board-certified cosmetic and oculoplastic surgeon, Dr. Mishra, has extensive training and years of experience focused on plastic and reconstructive eye surgery. Dr. Mishra will customize and tailor your treatment plan. With attentive care, he strives to meet your goals with results that look not only beautiful but also natural.

Read More »
A Doctor Holding A Woman's Eyelid Up While Tracing The Area For Eyelift Surgery Incision

Eyelid Lift Surgery (Blepharoplasty)

Eyelift surgery, also known as eyelid surgery or blepharoplasty, is a surgical procedure that is performed to remove excess skin from the upper eyelids and/or reduce bagginess from lower eyelids.

This procedure is done for both cosmetic and functional reasons. While it can improve appearances, it is also done to improve sight for those whose eyelids sag and get in the way of their vision.

Read More »

Cataracts Frequently Asked Questions

Play Video

The lens of the eye can be compared to a camera lens. The eye lens is found behind the iris and the pupil. The lens focuses the light back toward the retina and the image is recorded there. Like a camera lens, the eye lens can also adjust focus.

Unlike a camera, the eye lens is not made of glass; it is mainly made of water and protein.  In an eye with normal vision, this protein is arranged in a way that the lens is clear and light is able to pass through it. But, sometimes the protein clumps together and starts to cloud the lens. This is a cataract. Over time, the cataract can grow and cloud a larger area of the lens, making it progressively more difficult to see.

Gradually, as cataracts progress, patients may experience symptoms such as:
  • Painless cloudy, blurry or dim vision
  • More difficulty seeing at night or in low light
  • Sensitivity to light and glare
  • Seeing halos around lights
  • Faded or yellowed colors
  • The need for brighter light for reading and other activities
  • Frequent changes in eyeglass or contact lens prescriptions
  • Double vision within one eye

If the clouding is mild or only involves a small part of the lens, vision may only be slightly affected. If there is more clouding and it affects the entire lens, vision will become severely limited and cataract surgery becomes necessary.

Age is the most common cause of cataract. However, cataracts do not only affect senior citizens. In fact, people can have age-related cataracts in their 40s and 50s. Most with cataracts in middle age will not experience a major impact on vision; it may take several years for the cataract to advance to cause a more severe problem. There are less common types of cataracts, not related to normal aging; these include: Non-age related Cataracts from other disease or medication These cataracts are caused by other eye diseases or previous eye surgery. Chronic disease can make you more likely to develop cataracts; for example, diabetes has been proven to increase the risk of cataracts. Excessive use of steroid medications can spur the development of this type of cataract as well. Congenital or developmental Cataracts This type of cataract can occur in infants or children. These cases may be hereditary or they can be associated with some birth defects; some occur without any obvious cause. Traumatic Cataracts These cataracts are related directly to an eye injury. Traumatic cataracts may appear immediately following an injury, or they can develop several months or even years later.

Cataracts can be diagnosed through a comprehensive eye exam. Our doctors at Community Eye Center perform thousands of these exams each year. During the exam:

  •    Patients will have a visual test that uses an eye chart test to measures sight at various distances
  •    Patients will have a dilated eye exam, during which drops are placed in the eyes to widen, or dilate, the pupils; a magnifying lens is used to examine the retina and optic nerve for damage and/or other possible eye issues; after the exam, the patient’s vision might be blurry for a few hours
  •    Patients will undergo a tonometry test. During this test an instrument is used to measure the pressure inside the eye
  •    Some patients may also require other tests may be required to determine the health and examine the structure of the eye.

Cataract surgery is rarely an urgent situation. It should be done when the patient is medically stable and when the patient’s cataracts begin to interfere with the patient’s ability to function in everyday activities such as driving and reading. A cataract may need to be removed even if it is not causing vision problems. For example, it may be necessary to remove a cataract if it prevents examination or treatment of another eye issue, such as age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy.

Choosing the right lens depends on a variety of factors, including lifestyle, medical history and the patient’s visual needs and expectations. Our doctors take time with the patient to help determine the implant that will be best suited for their unique needs. If it is determined that surgery is appropriate, this questionnaire will help your surgeon provide the best treatment for your visual needs.

Community Eye Center and St. Lucy’s Outpatient Surgery Center perform only eye surgery; because of this, all of our procedures are efficient and streamlined. Upon arrival, patients walk into a very warm, friendly environment, where they are asked the appropriate questions by our staff and allowed to express their own questions and concerns prior to surgery. Patients are relieved to find the surgery is painless. The eye surgeon uses anesthetic eye drops to numb the eyes, as well as I.V. medication to relax the patient. Using a process called phacoemulsification; the surgeon breaks up the cataract and “vacuums” it from the eye pouch – a very safe and proven technique.  The lens implant is then inserted. In most cases, a suture is not needed. The entire process takes 15 minutes.

More than 60 percent of patients see better than 20/30 the first day after cataract surgery. Those with pre-existing medical conditions, such as macular degeneration, glaucoma and corneal problems, usually find it takes a little longer to see clearly.

Post-surgery our doctors prefer to see patients the day after the procedure, then five days later and then again after two weeks. Most patients’ eyes stabilize during that time. Antibiotic drops are given to prevent infection and ease inflammation.

It is not necessary to travel for superior eye care.  Community Eye Center’s St. Lucy’s Outpatient Surgery Center is the only outpatient eye surgery center in Charlotte County with national accreditation from the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care. To earn this, the facility has to adhere to a rigorous standard. The doctors at Community Eye Center deliver exceptional care; this is fostered by the fact that CEC specializes exclusively in eye care.

Community Eye Center Cataract Surgeons

Community Eye Center offers treatment and diagnosis for cataracts as well as multiple surgery options, including premium lens implants. Community Eye Center's cataract surgeons are board-certified and dedicated to providing patients with excellence in eye care.

Read More About Cataracts & Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Loving Couple Who Choose To Look Into Each Others' Eyes

Types of Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information about cataract surgery lens choices on the internet. The best and most up-to-date information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor.

Community Eye Center (CEC) is ophthalmology, optometry, optical in multiple Southwest Florida locations with its own AAAHC accredited eye-only surgery center.

Read More »
Providing Excellence In Care For Patients At Community Eye Center's Eye-Only Surgery Center, Dr. Michael A. Baskind, CRNA, PhD Stands Next To A Patient In A Post Cataract Surgery Recovery Room

Recovery After Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgeries are typically quick and uneventful. An estimated 3.5 million cataract removals are performed each year in the United States. It is one of the most common surgical procedures. Numbers also show that the chance of a good outcome and improved vision after surgery are excellent.

Read More »
Voted The Best Cataract Surgeon In The Area, Dr. Spadafora Performs A Cataract Surgery On A Patient At Community Eye Center's Eye-Only Surgery Center

About Cataract Surgery

Ophthalmologists, optometrists and eye health professionals work as a team to provide comprehensive eye care at Community Eye Center (CEC). Eye specialists including, cataract, glaucoma, retina and oculoplastics as well as an accredited eye only surgery center, CEC offers the best cataract surgery options possible for positive patient outcomes. Eye doctors may be seen at any of CEC’s multiple Florida locations in Port Charlotte, North Port, and Venice.

Read More »
An Eye-Only Surgery Center, Eye Clinic and Optical Shop, Community Eye Center Offers Patients, Like The One Smiling At The Camera, With Comprehensive Eye Care Including Treatment For Macular Degeneration, Cataracts, Glaucoma And More

Financial Assistance For Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is generally covered under insurance and Medicare plans. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose to upgrade your surgery to one of our elective procedures, such as a premium lens choice, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance for cataract surgery.

Read More »

Laser-Guided Cataract Surgery

Community Eye Center performs Laser-Guided Cataract Surgery. Dr. Schaible and Dr. Spadafora conducted research with a form of YAG laser in human cataract surgery more than a decade ago for the FDA.

Read More »

Premium Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

In the past, cataract surgery used to be about preventing blindness; however, with the sophisticated advances in cataract removal, premium lens choices and ORA laser-guided cataract surgery, surgeons can return a patient’s vision to the way it was years ago.

Read More »

Ready to schedule a consult?
Please call:

+1 (941) 625-1325

OR

Pay Your Bill Online

 
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center