Torn Retina & Cryopexy

Torn Retina & Cryopexy

To repair a retinal tear with Cryopexy, your eye surgeon uses a special probe that applies intense cold energy to freeze the retina around the tear. This creates swelling that eventually becomes scar tissue. It is this scar tissue that seals the retina to the wall of the eye- helping to prevent the retina from detaching completely.

Read More About Retina

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Torn Retina Informational Video

The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called vitreous. As we age, the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually, the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina so as the eye moves the vitreous moves away from the retina without causing problems. Sometimes though, the vitreous pulls hard enough to tear the retina. Flashes of light or floaters can appear in the field of vision.

Read More »

Torn Retina & Cryopexy

To repair a retinal tear with Cryopexy, your eye surgeon uses a special probe that applies intense cold energy to freeze the retina around the tear. This creates swelling that eventually becomes scar tissue. It is this scar tissue that seals the retina to the wall of the eye- helping to prevent the retina from detaching completely.

Read More »

Retinal Detachment and Tears

The retina is the light-sensitive area lining the back of the eye that sends signals through the optic nerve to the brain where these signals become the images that we see. The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called vitreous. As we age, the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina. So as the eye moves, the vitreous moves away from the retina without causing problems.

Read More »

Macular Holes

The inner eye is filled with a clear jelly-like substance called the vitreous. As we age the vitreous becomes less like jelly and more like liquid. Usually the vitreous is only loosely attached to the retina so as the eye moves, the vitreous moves away from the macula without causing problems. In some cases, however, the vitreous sticks to the macula and is unable to pull away. As a result, the macula tissue stretches and a hole may form.

Read More »

Flashes and Floaters

Vision changes can indicate a serious problem with the tissue that lines the back of the eyeball (retina) optic nerve or blood vessels in the eye. Evaluation by an eye doctors is needed for sudden vision changes, such as:

Flashes of light (photopsia). Photopsia is brief but recurrent streaks, sparks, or flickers of light, particularly when you move your eyes or head. The flashes of light may be easier to see when you look at a dark background. The brief flashes may occur with retinal detachment.

Read More »

Diabetic Retinopathy

More than 24 million people – eight percent of the population – have diabetes. Diabetes is a form of vascular disease. Elevated levels of blood sugar over a long period of time can result in damage to the eyes blood vessels and retina, impairing vision. If left untreated, the eye’s macula can be damaged.

Read More »

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-Related Macular Degeneration is a condition which affects the retina.

Light rays enter the eye through the cornea, pupil and lens. These light rays are focused on the retina, the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The retina sends signals through the optic nerve to the brain where these signals become the images we see.

Read More »

Blocked Tear Ducts and Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Surgery

Play Video

What is a blocked tear duct and how is it treated?

When you blink, a tear film spreads over the eye making the surface smooth and clear. The tear film is made up of three distinct layers. An oily layer, a watery layer and a mucous layer. Each layer is needed for the tear film to keep our eyes moist.

Tears protect the eyes and keep them moist and healthy. Tears come from the conjunctiva which is the clear tissue over the white of the eye, and from the lacrimal glands. These glands are located above each eye. The tears flow across the surface of your eye and drain through tiny holes called puncta. Puncta are in the corners of your upper and lower eyelids near the nose. The tears then travel through tiny passages in the eyelids. They eventually go into the nasal lacrimal duct before emptying into your nose; this is why your nose runs when you cry. When the tear drainage system is either partly or completely blocked, tears cannot drain normally. The eye becomes watery and irritated it can also be constantly infected.

A blocked tear duct can be due to:
  • Age
  • Injury
  • Infection
There are many treatment options for blocked tear ducts including:
  • Antibiotics
  • Massage
  • Tear Duct Probing and Flushing
  • Balloon Catheter Dilation
  • Stenting and Intubation
  • External and Endoscopic DCR

DCR Options for Blocked Tear Ducts

Commonly performed to treat blocked tear ducts, Community Eye Center offers dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)  surgery options. DCR is a procedure which opens the passageway for tears to drain properly out of the nose again. Patients are provided with general anesthesia or local anesthesia if the procedure is performed in an outpatient setting.

External Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)

External DCR is surgery that creates a new pathway for tears to drain from the eye when the tear duct is blocked. The surgeon will make a small incision near the inside corner of the eye. He or she will then create a new opening directly from the eye’s lacrimal sack into the nasal cavity to allow tears to drain. A surgical adhesive or stitches are used to close the incision and a tubelike stent may be used temporarily to keep the new drain from closing up while healing. The tube can be removed later in the physician’s office or outpatient surgery center.

Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)

Endoscopic DCR surgically creates a new pathway for tears to drain from the eye when the tear duct is blocked. The surgeon will insert a slender tube called an endoscope into your nasal cavity. He or she will then create a new opening directly from the eyes lacrimal sack into the nasal cavity to allow tears to drain. A flexible tube called a stent may be put in place temporarily to keep the new drain from closing up while healing. The tube can be removed later in the physician’s office or outpatient surgery center.

Community Eye Center offers treatment options for blocked tear ducts, including External and Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR).

Community Eye Center Oculoplastic Surgeon, Dr. Mishra

A talented and sought-after licensed Cosmetic and Oculoplastic Surgeon with board certification in Anti-aging Medicine. Dr. Mishra offers a comprehensive array of treatments, including cosmetic and functional eyelid surgery, BOTOX, cosmetic and other options at Community Eye Center.

Read More About Oculoplastics & Cosmetics

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Photo Of Woman Wearing Glasses With Blue Frames

Financing For Cosmetic, Oculoplastics and Eyelid Surgery

Many private health insurance plans will cover the cost of functional eyelid surgery; this procedure may also be covered under Medicare. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose an elective procedure, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance.

Read More »
Person On Operating Table At Community Eye Center's St. Lucy Eye Surgery Center, Smiling With Nurses Standing Nearby To Review

Entropion & Ectropion Repair

Community Eye Center offers Southwest Florida with the best oculoplastic, cosmetic and plastic surgery, including treatment of common eyelid malposition, entropion and ectropion repair.

Read More »
Photo Of A Woman With Blonde Eye Brows Holding Her Fingers To Her Eyes To Simulate An Eye Lift Procedure

Cosmetic Treatments, Oculofacial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Community Eye Center offers oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery options for patients with cosmetic, functional or reconstructive surgery needs. Our board-certified cosmetic and oculoplastic surgeon, Dr. Mishra, has extensive training and years of experience focused on plastic and reconstructive eye surgery. Dr. Mishra will customize and tailor your treatment plan. With attentive care, he strives to meet your goals with results that look not only beautiful but also natural.

Read More »
A Doctor Holding A Woman's Eyelid Up While Tracing The Area For Eyelift Surgery Incision

Eyelid Lift Surgery (Blepharoplasty)

Eyelift surgery, also known as eyelid surgery or blepharoplasty, is a surgical procedure that is performed to remove excess skin from the upper eyelids and/or reduce bagginess from lower eyelids.

This procedure is done for both cosmetic and functional reasons. While it can improve appearances, it is also done to improve sight for those whose eyelids sag and get in the way of their vision.

Read More »

Entropion & Ectropion Repair

Play Video

Entropion Repair

 

What is entropion and how is it repaired? 

With entropion, the eyelashes and skin of the eyelid turn into the eye; they rub against the cornea causing pain and irritation.

To repair an eyelid with entropion the eye surgeon will make an incision at the outer corner of the eyelid and along the eyelashes; sometimes the incision is made on the inside of the eyelid. Then, the surgeon will tighten the tendons that hold the eyelid in the correct position.

If entropion is caused by caused by scars or prior surgery, the eye surgeon may graft or surgically place a small amount of tissue from another area of the body; this helps lessen the pull on the eyelid caused by the scar and repositions the eyelid. This should help the skin and eyelashes from irritating the cornea.

Ectropion Repair

 

What is ectropion and how is it repaired? 

With ectropion, the lining of the inner eyelid is exposed. Tears do not drain properly from the eye leading to tearing and discomfort.

To repair ectropion the eye surgeon may tighten the tendons that normally hold the eyelid in the correct position. He or she may also remove a tiny piece of eyelid tissue to bring the lid back toward the eyeball.

If ectropion is caused by scars or prior surgery, a skin graft or place tissue from another part of the body may be used to relieve the tension caused by the scar and help reposition the eyelid. After surgery, the incisions made in the eyelid are closed with stitches or surgical adhesive.

Community Eye Center's Oculoplastic Surgeon

A talented and sought-after licensed Cosmetic and Oculoplastic Surgeon with board certification in Anti-aging Medicine. Dr. Mishra offers a comprehensive array of treatments, including cosmetic and functional eyelid surgery, BOTOX, cosmetic and other options at Community Eye Center.

Read More About Oculoplastics & Cosmetics

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Photo Of Woman Wearing Glasses With Blue Frames

Financing For Cosmetic, Oculoplastics and Eyelid Surgery

Many private health insurance plans will cover the cost of functional eyelid surgery; this procedure may also be covered under Medicare. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose an elective procedure, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance.

Read More »
Person On Operating Table At Community Eye Center's St. Lucy Eye Surgery Center, Smiling With Nurses Standing Nearby To Review

Entropion & Ectropion Repair

Community Eye Center offers Southwest Florida with the best oculoplastic, cosmetic and plastic surgery, including treatment of common eyelid malposition, entropion and ectropion repair.

Read More »
Photo Of A Woman With Blonde Eye Brows Holding Her Fingers To Her Eyes To Simulate An Eye Lift Procedure

Cosmetic Treatments, Oculofacial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Community Eye Center offers oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery options for patients with cosmetic, functional or reconstructive surgery needs. Our board-certified cosmetic and oculoplastic surgeon, Dr. Mishra, has extensive training and years of experience focused on plastic and reconstructive eye surgery. Dr. Mishra will customize and tailor your treatment plan. With attentive care, he strives to meet your goals with results that look not only beautiful but also natural.

Read More »
A Doctor Holding A Woman's Eyelid Up While Tracing The Area For Eyelift Surgery Incision

Eyelid Lift Surgery (Blepharoplasty)

Eyelift surgery, also known as eyelid surgery or blepharoplasty, is a surgical procedure that is performed to remove excess skin from the upper eyelids and/or reduce bagginess from lower eyelids.

This procedure is done for both cosmetic and functional reasons. While it can improve appearances, it is also done to improve sight for those whose eyelids sag and get in the way of their vision.

Read More »

Glaucoma Treatment Options

Treatment options for glaucoma include eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. When treating glaucoma, the goal is to prevent vision loss, as the disease is progressive and vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. When glaucoma is detected early, it is drastically more manageable; and with proper medical treatment, most people will not lose their sight.

There are many medications that can be prescribed to prevent vision-threatening damage. Discussing all of the potential side effects and finding the right treatment or combination of treatments for each patient, the doctors at Community Eye Center work as a team with their patients in the battle against glaucoma.

Surgical Glaucoma Treatment Options

If medications alone do not achieve the desired results or have intolerable side effects, our doctors may suggest surgery for glaucoma management.

Trabecular Bypass Stent Surgery

To implant a trabecular bypass stent, your ophthalmologist will create a small incision in your cornea. Then he or she will place a stent, which looks like a tiny tube, into part of the eye’s drainage system. The stent allows fluid to bypass an area that is not draining efficiently. This reduces eye pressure.

Laser Trabeculoplasty

With laser trabeculoplasty, your surgeon will put a special contact lens on your eye. This helps focus and deliver the light from the laser to the precise location. The surgeon applies the low energy laser to the area called the trabecular meshwork; this is where fluid naturally drains from the eye. The laser causes microscopic changes in the eye’s tissue allowing fluid to drain better, reducing eye pressure.

Implant Surgery

In glaucoma implant surgery, the drainage implant is usually placed in the area under either the upper or lower eyelid. Your ophthalmologist will stitch the implant to the sclera, the white part of your eye. Your ophthalmologist may cover the tube of the implant with a patch. Fluid will drain out to the area around the implant. A tiny tube is attached to the drainage implant and inserted into the front chamber of the eye, usually just in front of the iris. The tube sends fluid from the inside of the eye to the implant where it is absorbed into the body.

Laser Iridotomy

With laser iridotomy, the ophthalmologist uses a focused beam of light to create a tiny opening about the size of a pinhead in the iris; this opening allows trapped fluid behind the iris to flow into the front of the eye, usually reducing pressure. A laser iridotomy is an important way to treat or prevent a sudden rise in eye pressure that can seriously affect your eyesight.

Mini Filtration Implants

In mini filtration implant surgery, your ophthalmologist will create a small flap underneath the upper eyelid in the sclera, the white part of your eye. Then he or she will implant a tiny drainage device under the flap. This device is called a mini shunt, which opens a pathway for fluid to drain from inside the eye. The fluid collects in an area around the implant caused a filtering bleb, where it is gradually absorbed into the body.

Trabeculectomy

During trabeculectomy surgery, your ophthalmologist makes a tiny incision in the conjunctiva, the clear lining over the sclera (or the white part of the eye); this is done under your upper eyelid and near the edge of the iris. Next, he or she will create a small flap in the sclera underneath the incision. Then, a tiny piece of tissue is removed under the flap to make an opening into the eye. A small piece of the iris may also be removed to keep it from blocking the opening. This opening serves as a new channel for fluid to drain gradually from the eye, reducing pressure. The flap is sewn back into place with tiny stitches, which help guard against too much fluid draining out at once. The area where the fluid drains from the trabeculectomy is called a filtering bleb. As fluid filters out of the eye and into the bleb, it looks like a bubble. Because the bleb is under the eyelid, it is not usually visible.

Community Eye Center Doctors

Community Eye Center offers comprehensive eye care from multiple South West Florida locations.

Read More About Glaucoma & Glaucoma Treatment Options

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Glaucoma Informational Video

In the healthy eye, fluid called aqueous humour is made in the front of the eye and flows out through a tiny drain called the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is located in an area called the drainage angle. If fluid does not flow out of the drainage angle properly, eye pressure increases and damages the optic nerve.

Read More »
A photo showing how if the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Closed Angle Glaucoma

If the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Read More »

Types Of Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma, the most common form of the disease, occurs when the eye’s drainage canals become clogged over time, resulting in increased eye pressure that causes damage to the eye’s optic nerve.

Read More »

Glaucoma Treatment Options

Treatment options for glaucoma include eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. When treating glaucoma, the goal is to prevent vision loss, as the disease is progressive and vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. When glaucoma is detected early, it is drastically more manageable; and with proper medical treatment, most people will not lose their sight.

Read More »

Pay Your Bill Online

 
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center