Free Vision Screenings

Upcoming Event: Free Vision Screenings

What

Free vision screenings provided by Dr. Karen Memoli, a board-certified optometrist at Community Eye Center

When

September 27, 2019 from 10 AM until 1 PM

Where

For more information, please call Community Eye Center at (941) 625-1325

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More Events

Free Cataract Screenings & Seminar

Dr. Bradley O’Neill will hold a free cataract seminar and offer free cataract screenings.

Attendance is reserved for the first 25 to RSVP before January 7th, 2020. Please call (941) 625-1325 to RSVP for this event.

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Free Vision Screenings

Upcoming Event: Free Vision Screenings What Free vision screenings provided by Dr. Karen Memoli, a board-certified optometrist at Community Eye Center When September 27, 2019

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Community Eye Center At Art In The Dark

Dr. Spadafora, Dr. Spalding and Dr. Roberts attend gala at which Community Eye Center was a presenting sponsor.

During the event, guests experienced art as those with low vision do: by using other senses.

All proceeds benefit Lighthouse of Manasota, which helps to educate and empower those with vision loss so they may enjoy happy, healthy and independent lives.

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Our Doctors

Closed Angle Glaucoma

Closed Angle Glaucoma

If the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Read More About Glaucoma & Glaucoma Treatment Options

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Glaucoma Informational Video

In the healthy eye, fluid called aqueous humour is made in the front of the eye and flows out through a tiny drain called the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is located in an area called the drainage angle. If fluid does not flow out of the drainage angle properly, eye pressure increases and damages the optic nerve.

Read More »
A photo showing how if the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Closed Angle Glaucoma

If the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Read More »

Types Of Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma, the most common form of the disease, occurs when the eye’s drainage canals become clogged over time, resulting in increased eye pressure that causes damage to the eye’s optic nerve.

Read More »

Glaucoma Treatment Options

Treatment options for glaucoma include eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. When treating glaucoma, the goal is to prevent vision loss, as the disease is progressive and vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. When glaucoma is detected early, it is drastically more manageable; and with proper medical treatment, most people will not lose their sight.

Read More »

Blocked Tear Ducts and Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Surgery

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What is a blocked tear duct and how is it treated?

When you blink, a tear film spreads over the eye making the surface smooth and clear. The tear film is made up of three distinct layers. An oily layer, a watery layer and a mucous layer. Each layer is needed for the tear film to keep our eyes moist.

Tears protect the eyes and keep them moist and healthy. Tears come from the conjunctiva which is the clear tissue over the white of the eye, and from the lacrimal glands. These glands are located above each eye. The tears flow across the surface of your eye and drain through tiny holes called puncta. Puncta are in the corners of your upper and lower eyelids near the nose. The tears then travel through tiny passages in the eyelids. They eventually go into the nasal lacrimal duct before emptying into your nose; this is why your nose runs when you cry. When the tear drainage system is either partly or completely blocked, tears cannot drain normally. The eye becomes watery and irritated it can also be constantly infected.

A blocked tear duct can be due to:
  • Age
  • Injury
  • Infection
There are many treatment options for blocked tear ducts including:
  • Antibiotics
  • Massage
  • Tear Duct Probing and Flushing
  • Balloon Catheter Dilation
  • Stenting and Intubation
  • External and Endoscopic DCR

DCR Options for Blocked Tear Ducts

Commonly performed to treat blocked tear ducts, Community Eye Center offers dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)  surgery options. DCR is a procedure which opens the passageway for tears to drain properly out of the nose again. Patients are provided with general anesthesia or local anesthesia if the procedure is performed in an outpatient setting.

External Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)

External DCR is surgery that creates a new pathway for tears to drain from the eye when the tear duct is blocked. The surgeon will make a small incision near the inside corner of the eye. He or she will then create a new opening directly from the eye’s lacrimal sack into the nasal cavity to allow tears to drain. A surgical adhesive or stitches are used to close the incision and a tubelike stent may be used temporarily to keep the new drain from closing up while healing. The tube can be removed later in the physician’s office or outpatient surgery center.

Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)

Endoscopic DCR surgically creates a new pathway for tears to drain from the eye when the tear duct is blocked. The surgeon will insert a slender tube called an endoscope into your nasal cavity. He or she will then create a new opening directly from the eyes lacrimal sack into the nasal cavity to allow tears to drain. A flexible tube called a stent may be put in place temporarily to keep the new drain from closing up while healing. The tube can be removed later in the physician’s office or outpatient surgery center.

Community Eye Center offers treatment options for blocked tear ducts, including External and Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR).

Community Eye Center Oculoplastic Surgeon, Dr. Mishra

A talented and sought-after licensed Cosmetic and Oculoplastic Surgeon with board certification in Anti-aging Medicine. Dr. Mishra offers a comprehensive array of treatments, including cosmetic and functional eyelid surgery, BOTOX, cosmetic and other options at Community Eye Center.

Read More About Oculoplastics & Cosmetics

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Photo Of Woman Wearing Glasses With Blue Frames

Financing For Cosmetic, Oculoplastics and Eyelid Surgery

Many private health insurance plans will cover the cost of functional eyelid surgery; this procedure may also be covered under Medicare. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose an elective procedure, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance.

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Person On Operating Table At Community Eye Center's St. Lucy Eye Surgery Center, Smiling With Nurses Standing Nearby To Review

Entropion & Ectropion Repair

Community Eye Center offers Southwest Florida with the best oculoplastic, cosmetic and plastic surgery, including treatment of common eyelid malposition, entropion and ectropion repair.

Read More »
Photo Of A Woman With Blonde Eye Brows Holding Her Fingers To Her Eyes To Simulate An Eye Lift Procedure

Cosmetic Treatments, Oculofacial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Community Eye Center offers oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery options for patients with cosmetic, functional or reconstructive surgery needs. Our board-certified cosmetic and oculoplastic surgeon, Dr. Mishra, has extensive training and years of experience focused on plastic and reconstructive eye surgery. Dr. Mishra will customize and tailor your treatment plan. With attentive care, he strives to meet your goals with results that look not only beautiful but also natural.

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A Doctor Holding A Woman's Eyelid Up While Tracing The Area For Eyelift Surgery Incision

Eyelid Lift Surgery (Blepharoplasty)

Eyelift surgery, also known as eyelid surgery or blepharoplasty, is a surgical procedure that is performed to remove excess skin from the upper eyelids and/or reduce bagginess from lower eyelids.

This procedure is done for both cosmetic and functional reasons. While it can improve appearances, it is also done to improve sight for those whose eyelids sag and get in the way of their vision.

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Glaucoma Treatment Options

Treatment options for glaucoma include eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. When treating glaucoma, the goal is to prevent vision loss, as the disease is progressive and vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. When glaucoma is detected early, it is drastically more manageable; and with proper medical treatment, most people will not lose their sight.

There are many medications that can be prescribed to prevent vision-threatening damage. Discussing all of the potential side effects and finding the right treatment or combination of treatments for each patient, the doctors at Community Eye Center work as a team with their patients in the battle against glaucoma.

Surgical Glaucoma Treatment Options

If medications alone do not achieve the desired results or have intolerable side effects, our doctors may suggest surgery for glaucoma management.

Trabecular Bypass Stent Surgery

To implant a trabecular bypass stent, your ophthalmologist will create a small incision in your cornea. Then he or she will place a stent, which looks like a tiny tube, into part of the eye’s drainage system. The stent allows fluid to bypass an area that is not draining efficiently. This reduces eye pressure.

Laser Trabeculoplasty

With laser trabeculoplasty, your surgeon will put a special contact lens on your eye. This helps focus and deliver the light from the laser to the precise location. The surgeon applies the low energy laser to the area called the trabecular meshwork; this is where fluid naturally drains from the eye. The laser causes microscopic changes in the eye’s tissue allowing fluid to drain better, reducing eye pressure.

Implant Surgery

In glaucoma implant surgery, the drainage implant is usually placed in the area under either the upper or lower eyelid. Your ophthalmologist will stitch the implant to the sclera, the white part of your eye. Your ophthalmologist may cover the tube of the implant with a patch. Fluid will drain out to the area around the implant. A tiny tube is attached to the drainage implant and inserted into the front chamber of the eye, usually just in front of the iris. The tube sends fluid from the inside of the eye to the implant where it is absorbed into the body.

Laser Iridotomy

With laser iridotomy, the ophthalmologist uses a focused beam of light to create a tiny opening about the size of a pinhead in the iris; this opening allows trapped fluid behind the iris to flow into the front of the eye, usually reducing pressure. A laser iridotomy is an important way to treat or prevent a sudden rise in eye pressure that can seriously affect your eyesight.

Mini Filtration Implants

In mini filtration implant surgery, your ophthalmologist will create a small flap underneath the upper eyelid in the sclera, the white part of your eye. Then he or she will implant a tiny drainage device under the flap. This device is called a mini shunt, which opens a pathway for fluid to drain from inside the eye. The fluid collects in an area around the implant caused a filtering bleb, where it is gradually absorbed into the body.

Trabeculectomy

During trabeculectomy surgery, your ophthalmologist makes a tiny incision in the conjunctiva, the clear lining over the sclera (or the white part of the eye); this is done under your upper eyelid and near the edge of the iris. Next, he or she will create a small flap in the sclera underneath the incision. Then, a tiny piece of tissue is removed under the flap to make an opening into the eye. A small piece of the iris may also be removed to keep it from blocking the opening. This opening serves as a new channel for fluid to drain gradually from the eye, reducing pressure. The flap is sewn back into place with tiny stitches, which help guard against too much fluid draining out at once. The area where the fluid drains from the trabeculectomy is called a filtering bleb. As fluid filters out of the eye and into the bleb, it looks like a bubble. Because the bleb is under the eyelid, it is not usually visible.

Community Eye Center Doctors

Community Eye Center offers comprehensive eye care from multiple South West Florida locations.

Read More About Glaucoma & Glaucoma Treatment Options

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Glaucoma Informational Video

In the healthy eye, fluid called aqueous humour is made in the front of the eye and flows out through a tiny drain called the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is located in an area called the drainage angle. If fluid does not flow out of the drainage angle properly, eye pressure increases and damages the optic nerve.

Read More »
A photo showing how if the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Closed Angle Glaucoma

If the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Read More »

Types Of Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma, the most common form of the disease, occurs when the eye’s drainage canals become clogged over time, resulting in increased eye pressure that causes damage to the eye’s optic nerve.

Read More »

Glaucoma Treatment Options

Treatment options for glaucoma include eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. When treating glaucoma, the goal is to prevent vision loss, as the disease is progressive and vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. When glaucoma is detected early, it is drastically more manageable; and with proper medical treatment, most people will not lose their sight.

Read More »

Glaucoma Importance Of Early Detection

There are many online articles about the importance of early detection of glaucoma. The best information comes from a board-certified eye doctor. Community Eye Center utilizes Ocular Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging to assist in the early detection and monitoring of glaucoma. The OCT uses special digital scanning techniques to photograph and measure the structure of the retinal and optic nerve. The exam is quick, painless and non-invasive. The patient’s first OCT images act as a baseline, which can be compared to subsequent images. The optic nerve is made up of more than one million nerve fibers. The OCT gives us a detailed look at the eye’s nerve fibers, so we can observe the very subtle changes to these fibers that are indicative of glaucoma. This means we can make a glaucoma diagnosis earlier. This is especially important because although a high-pressure reading is common with glaucoma, it is not always present.

Premium Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

In the past, cataract surgery used to be about preventing blindness; however, with the sophisticated advances in cataract removal, premium lens choices and ORA laser-guided cataract surgery, surgeons can return a patient’s vision to the way it was years ago.

Patients seeking clearer distance and night vision without glasses or the ability to see clearly across distances after cataract surgery may consider a customized surgical option with a premium multifocal implant.

MIntraocular lenses (IOLs) are used to replace clouded lenses during cataract surgery. These lenses are implanted inside the eye when the original lens is removed. This is called refractive lens exchange. There are three types of lens exchanges available:

  • Standard Monofocal IOL
  • Multifocal IOL
  • Astigmatism-Correcting IOL

At Community Eye Center, the cataract surgeons consult with patients about their vision goals and different lens options. With this individualized treatment, eligible patients may choose a replacement lens that can correct multiple eye conditions.

Community Eye Center Cataract Surgeons

Community Eye Center offers treatment and diagnosis for cataracts as well as multiple surgery options, including premium lens implants. Community Eye Center's cataract surgeons are board-certified and dedicated to providing patients with excellence in eye care.

Read More About Cataracts & Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Loving Couple Who Choose To Look Into Each Others' Eyes

Types of Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information about cataract surgery lens choices on the internet. The best and most up-to-date information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor.

Community Eye Center (CEC) is ophthalmology, optometry, optical in multiple Southwest Florida locations with its own AAAHC accredited eye-only surgery center.

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Providing Excellence In Care For Patients At Community Eye Center's Eye-Only Surgery Center, Dr. Michael A. Baskind, CRNA, PhD Stands Next To A Patient In A Post Cataract Surgery Recovery Room

Recovery After Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgeries are typically quick and uneventful. An estimated 3.5 million cataract removals are performed each year in the United States. It is one of the most common surgical procedures. Numbers also show that the chance of a good outcome and improved vision after surgery are excellent.

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Voted The Best Cataract Surgeon In The Area, Dr. Spadafora Performs A Cataract Surgery On A Patient At Community Eye Center's Eye-Only Surgery Center

About Cataract Surgery

Ophthalmologists, optometrists and eye health professionals work as a team to provide comprehensive eye care at Community Eye Center (CEC). Eye specialists including, cataract, glaucoma, retina and oculoplastics as well as an accredited eye only surgery center, CEC offers the best cataract surgery options possible for positive patient outcomes. Eye doctors may be seen at any of CEC’s multiple Florida locations in Port Charlotte, North Port, and Venice.

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An Eye-Only Surgery Center, Eye Clinic and Optical Shop, Community Eye Center Offers Patients, Like The One Smiling At The Camera, With Comprehensive Eye Care Including Treatment For Macular Degeneration, Cataracts, Glaucoma And More

Financial Assistance For Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is generally covered under insurance and Medicare plans. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose to upgrade your surgery to one of our elective procedures, such as a premium lens choice, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance for cataract surgery.

Read More »

Laser-Guided Cataract Surgery

Community Eye Center performs Laser-Guided Cataract Surgery. Dr. Schaible and Dr. Spadafora conducted research with a form of YAG laser in human cataract surgery more than a decade ago for the FDA.

Read More »

Premium Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

In the past, cataract surgery used to be about preventing blindness; however, with the sophisticated advances in cataract removal, premium lens choices and ORA laser-guided cataract surgery, surgeons can return a patient’s vision to the way it was years ago.

Read More »

Ophthalmology Around The World

01/09/19

Ophthalmology And Treating Cataracts Around The World

Some may think of their work as an obligation and travel as a luxury. However, the eye health professionals at Community Eye Center (CEC) understand the impact that combining the two can have on people.

Many know that CEC’s eye surgeons perform advanced eye research as well as thousands of vision-restoring procedures in Florida, annually. However, did you know that some of the doctors have also taken the practice around the world? Dr. Spadafora and Dr. Schaible packed up their bags with their passion for ophthalmology when they collectively traveled nearly 10,000 miles in their mission of bettering the lives and vision of others.

If you ask any of the ophthalmologists, optometrists, opticians or staff at Community Eye Center about “I Care. Eye Care.,” you will learn that it reaches beyond the broadcast airing in Southwest Florida. This philosophy of care is the cornerstone upon which the entire practice is built. This patient-centric approach to care incorporates the mission of CEC and involves attending to each patient’s individualized needs as well as providing a superior level of eye care to deliver the best outcomes possible.

Because this philosophy of care is found inside the character of the providers at CEC, “I Care. Eye Care.” is not confined within the walls of the facility.

Community Eye Center eye surgeons take their practice to new places, helping people around the world.

For example, Dr. Spadafora took this purpose-driven method with him when he traveled to Florence, Italy. While there, he toured The Morgagni Clinic (Morgagni is known as “The Father of Cataract Research,” with his name as a legacy to his foundational work) and shared research experience with some of the areas top medical providers. During the trip, Dr. Spadafora expanded his skills and knowledge when he observed/performed cataract surgery as well as complex glaucoma surgery.

Dr. Schaible also carried “I Care. Eye Care.,”  with him on his journey to the Panamanian Jungle. On this excursion, he and a team flew to an area in the Panamanian Rain Forest where they performed cataract surgery on 42 villagers.

While in the Panamanian Jungle, he did not have access to the same technology and resources. At St. Lucy’s Eye Surgery Center, Dr. Schaible and all of the eye health professionals are well-equipped with advanced resources. The technological capabilities and resources provided by St. Lucy’s Eye Surgery Center contribute to a high outcome of success in Dr. Schaible’s vision-restoration procedures and surgeries. Even without all of the technology, all of the eye surgeries and procedures he performed during his expedition were without incident.

Providing excellence in care requires intense dedication. While traveling for leisure can be extremely fun and beneficial, Dr. Spadafora and Dr. Schaible found it just as satisfying to see the world with a purpose.

In the past 38 years, the doctors and staff at Community Eye Center have established and strengthened the meaning behind “I Care. Eye Care.,” in Florida. Dr. Spadafora and Dr. Schaible lived “I Care. Eye Care.,”  thousands of miles away from their practice. Every day, the physicians and staff members at CEC bring”I Care. Eye Care.,” to life by providing excellence in eye care with a personalized approach to patients.

Scary Facts About Halloween Contacts (With Photos)

It’s that time of year again. Halloween offers us a time to talk about special effect contacts.

Special effect contact lenses are a favorite way for people to distinguish a look or costume. These contacts are extremely popular around Halloween as a way to add a creative edge and help costumes stand out from the other ghouls and goblins. But, scarier than any character that goes bump in the night this time of year, wearing contacts that without a proper fitting or prescription can cause eye damage and even blindness. This article outlines some of the safety tips to ensure the proper use of special effect contact lenses.

Many may not consider the dangers of wearing contact lenses. However, Community Eye Center would like to inform about the risks of improper use of contacts that are not fitted by an eye doctor. These dangers include:

  • Blurred or hazy vision
  • Red, irritated eyes
  • Eye Pain
  • Bacterial infections (including microbial keratitis)
  • Allergic responses
  • Irreversible vision loss/blindness

Even if vision correction is not needed, for safety,  people should never purchase contact lenses without obtaining a contact lens fitting and prescription from an eye doctor. Contact lenses purchased from costume shops, convenience stores or anywhere that do not require a prescription from an ophthalmologist or optometrist can be extremely harmful to vision and health.

Whatsmore, eye health professionals will offer information about how to store, wear and clean contact lenses including tips for safe handling.  Adhering to the advice from your eye doctor can make a big difference in preventing eye conditions caused by wearing contact lenses.

Below are some epic costume looks that can be safely achieved with proper use of special effect contacts.

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Directed by the desire to care for patients’ individual needs, Community Eye Center offers an array of eye health services from complex surgery cases as well as routine eye exams and contact lens fittings. Call 941-625-1325 or schedule your eye exam online today.

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Which Eye Care Professional To Choose: Ophthalmologist, Optometrist or Optician?

Which Eye Care Professional To Choose: Ophthalmologist, Optometrist or Optician?

There is a question about eye care professionals that our staff receives frequently. It is a question that is hugely significant when scheduling an eye appointment at Community Eye Center.

“What’re the differences between ophthalmologists, optometrists and opticians?”

We are always happy to address this concern for patients because it streamlines their visit by providing them with eye care that suits their individual eye needs. Whether a patient requires a comprehensive eye exam, eyeglasses, or is seeking treatment for a more complex eye condition, Community Eye Center’s goal is to offer expedient care and direct patients to the best eye care provider for their needs.

While there is some overlap in the services provided, the levels of training and expertise are unique to each type of provider. To alleviate confusion, here is a glimpse at the different care that each of these providers offers:

Ophthalmologist

Often, the term “eye doctor” is used as a universal term to describe ophthalmologists and optometrists. The use of this name is accurate because they are both doctors who concentrated in eye care. However, there are differences in the level of training and what ophthalmologists or optometrists can diagnose and treat.

The critical distinction between an ophthalmologist and an optometrist is that an ophthalmologist is a medical or osteopathic doctor (MD or DO) who specializes in eye and vision care.

As a doctor of medicine, who has completed school and a minimum of eight years of medical training, ophthalmologists can diagnose and treat any eye condition or disease, perform eye surgery and prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses for vision correction. Ophthalmologists are qualified to care for all eye conditions and diseases.

Ophthalmologists are often also involved in scientific research about the causes and cures for eye diseases and vision disorders. Some ophthalmologists may also choose to specialize in a specific area of their medical training or surgical eye care. These subspecialties require additional fellowship training. Subspecialties of ophthalmology may include glaucoma, retina, cornea, pediatrics, and plastic surgery. This extensive training is to prepare ophthalmologists to care for more complex cases in specific areas of the eye.

Optometrist

Optometrists are licensed to practice optometry, but are not medical doctors and do not perform eye surgery. Optometrists hold a doctor of optometry (OD) degree after completing four years of optometry school, preceded by three years or more years of college.

Optometrists are doctors who provide care ranging from comprehensive eye examinations and vision correction with the fitting of glasses and contact lenses to diagnosis and management of ocular diseases such as glaucoma, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, pre and post-operative care for surgical patients, and dry eye evaluations.

Optician

Opticians are technicians who receive training to design and fit eyeglass lenses, frames and contacts as well as other vision correcting devices. They may use prescriptions which are provided by ophthalmologists or optometrists but cannot test vision or write prescriptions for vision correction. Opticians cannot diagnose or treat eye conditions or diseases.

If you would like more information about the eye care providers at Community Eye Center, Schedule an appointment with one of Community Eye Center. You may also call Community Eye Center at +1-941-625-1325 for information or to schedule an appointment.


For over 30 years, Community Eye Center (CEC) and its eye doctors have provided excellence in eye care from multiple south-west Florida locations, eye only surgery center, and optical services. CEC offers total eye care including cataract surgery, dry eye treatment, treatment of macular degeneration and all other retinal diseases, glaucoma treatment, diabetic eye exams, eyelid & cosmetic surgery, comprehensive eye exams, contact lenses & glasses, and 24/7 emergency eye care. Selecting only the most qualified and dedicated eye health professionals (board-certified ophthalmologists, optometrists, opticians, eye surgeons, oculoplastic specialists, cataract specialists, and more), CEC offers comprehensive and expedient care.

Tips To Prevent Computer Eye Strain

Tips To Prevent Computer Eye Strain

VENICE/NORTH PORT/PORT CHARLOTTE, FL— SEP 27, 2018 With a constant increase in the use of technology, many have found careers that require them to stare at computer screens for several hours at a time. This can cause the eyes to strain. Problems with the eyes can occur and are categorized as computer vision syndrome or CVS. This syndrome doesn’t describe a single issue; however, it is a category of problems that include eye strain and pain. Those working in computer jobs are not the only to be affected by CVS. Children may also be affected since they use tablets and computers during school and leisure. Moreover, this can be especially harmful if lighting and posture are not ideal. Some measures can help to prevent computer vision syndrome. Here are five tips to help keep your eyes healthy and to avoid eye damage:

1)  Get routine comprehensive eye exams

It is recommended that those who work on their computers have comprehensive eye exams once per year. Routine eye exams are essential to maintaining eye health. It may very well be the most crucial step to prevent computer vision problems. During your comprehensive eye exam, share your computer usage (including how far you sit from the screen) with your eye doctor. This will help the eye doctor monitor the effects of your computer usage on your eyes. Your eye doctor can even test your eyes at working distances.

2) Check your lighting and computer settings

If the room is too dark or too bright, this may contribute to eye strain while working on the computer. Some monitors come with features that help to minimize eye strain. If your computer offers a setting which automatically adjusts the screen brightness according to the room’s lighting, this may help to manage eye stress. You may also need to adjust other monitor settings such as text size and the screen’s color temperature (lower color temperatures give off less blue light which is connected to eye strain).

3)  Take breaks

Taking short and frequent breaks from the computer throughout the day can significantly reduce eye strain. An excellent practice is the 20-20-20 rule. Every 20 minutes look away from the computer screen at an object that is at least 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

4) Blink

While working on the computer, people often forget to blink. Blinking is vital because it moistens your eyes to prevent dryness and irritation. To moisten eyes during computer sessions, you can try blinking slowly 10 times every 20 minutes. This may help to rewet your eyes. If you find that your eyes are still dry, you may suffer from a widespread and treatable condition called dry eye disease. Your eye doctor can address this concern during your comprehensive eye exam and may offer testing and treatment options.

5) Invest in computer eyewear

The best comfort may be found with eyeglasses that are designed specifically for computer use. Eyeglasses can be professionally modified to accommodate prolonged computer use better. Your optician can help to select features based on your daily screen time and eye concerns. If you would like more information about how to reduce computer eye strain, computer eyewear, dry eye disease or to schedule an appointment for a comprehensive eye exam, please call Community Eye Center at +1-941-625-1325 For over 30 years, Community Eye Center (CEC) and its eye doctors have provided excellence in eye care from multiple south-west Florida locations, eye only surgery center, and optical services. CEC offers total eye care including cataract surgery, dry eye treatment, treatment of macular degeneration and all other retinal diseases, glaucoma treatment, diabetic eye exams, eyelid & cosmetic surgery, comprehensive eye exams, contact lenses & glasses, and 24/7 emergency eye care. Selecting only the most qualified and dedicated eye health professionals (board-certified ophthalmologists, optometrists, opticians, eye surgeons, oculoplastic specialists, cataract specialists, and more), CEC offers comprehensive and expedient care.

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