Cataract Surgeon Port Charlotte Florida

Dr. Eric A. Liss, MD

Dr. Eric Liss A Top Cataract Surgeon In Port Charlotte, North Port And Venice Florida Poses For His Headshot At Community Eye Center, A Full-Service Eye Care Clinic
Click Image To Request An Appointment

Board-Certified Ophthalmologist

Google
5/5

A Board-Certified Ophthalmologist, Dr. Liss provides comprehensive ophthalmic care with an interest in advanced cataract surgery, macular degeneration and inflammatory disorders of the eye.

Publishing research in the areas of retinal disease, refractive surgery, glaucoma and disorders of the ocular immune system, Dr. Liss is a recognized speaker, presenting his findings at multiple national ophthalmology conferences.

Providing a full range of superior ophthalmic care to patients, Dr. Liss considers treating patients to be his privilege; he is motivated by improving the lives of his patients. He recalls the greatest honor of his career as surgically restoring sight for a patient who became completely reliant upon the care of family members due to advanced cataracts.

Born and raised in Sarasota, FL, he is proud to call himself a native Floridian. Spending the majority of his life in Southwest Florida, he values the community and cherishes any opportunity to participate in the many local charities and causes that Community Eye Center supports.

Dr. Liss spends his free time enjoying the beautiful weather in Southwest Florida with his dog, gardening and cultivating tropical fruit.

Board Certification

AAO ( American Academy of Ophthamology) Board Certified

  • American Academy of Ophthalmology Florida Medical Association

  • Florida Society of Ophthalmology

  • Charlotte County Medical Association

Education

Residency: University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Internship: Riverside Regional Medical Center, Hampton Roads, VA

Medical School: Florida International University College of Medicine, Miami, FL (Summa Cum Laude)

Graduate: Emory University, Atlanta, GA (Public Health and Epidemiology)

Undergraduate: Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Glaucoma Informational Video

Glaucoma Informational Video

In the healthy eye, fluid called aqueous humour is made in the front of the eye and flows out through a tiny drain called the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is located in an area called the drainage angle. If fluid does not flow out of the drainage angle properly, eye pressure increases and damages the optic nerve.

Read More About Glaucoma & Glaucoma Treatment Options

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Glaucoma Informational Video

In the healthy eye, fluid called aqueous humour is made in the front of the eye and flows out through a tiny drain called the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is located in an area called the drainage angle. If fluid does not flow out of the drainage angle properly, eye pressure increases and damages the optic nerve.

Read More »
A photo showing how if the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Closed Angle Glaucoma

If the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Read More »

Types Of Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma, the most common form of the disease, occurs when the eye’s drainage canals become clogged over time, resulting in increased eye pressure that causes damage to the eye’s optic nerve.

Read More »

Glaucoma Treatment Options

Treatment options for glaucoma include eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. When treating glaucoma, the goal is to prevent vision loss, as the disease is progressive and vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. When glaucoma is detected early, it is drastically more manageable; and with proper medical treatment, most people will not lose their sight.

Read More »

Blocked Tear Ducts and Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Surgery

Play Video

What is a blocked tear duct and how is it treated?

When you blink, a tear film spreads over the eye making the surface smooth and clear. The tear film is made up of three distinct layers. An oily layer, a watery layer and a mucous layer. Each layer is needed for the tear film to keep our eyes moist.

Tears protect the eyes and keep them moist and healthy. Tears come from the conjunctiva which is the clear tissue over the white of the eye, and from the lacrimal glands. These glands are located above each eye. The tears flow across the surface of your eye and drain through tiny holes called puncta. Puncta are in the corners of your upper and lower eyelids near the nose. The tears then travel through tiny passages in the eyelids. They eventually go into the nasal lacrimal duct before emptying into your nose; this is why your nose runs when you cry. When the tear drainage system is either partly or completely blocked, tears cannot drain normally. The eye becomes watery and irritated it can also be constantly infected.

A blocked tear duct can be due to:
  • Age
  • Injury
  • Infection
There are many treatment options for blocked tear ducts including:
  • Antibiotics
  • Massage
  • Tear Duct Probing and Flushing
  • Balloon Catheter Dilation
  • Stenting and Intubation
  • External and Endoscopic DCR

DCR Options for Blocked Tear Ducts

Commonly performed to treat blocked tear ducts, Community Eye Center offers dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)  surgery options. DCR is a procedure which opens the passageway for tears to drain properly out of the nose again. Patients are provided with general anesthesia or local anesthesia if the procedure is performed in an outpatient setting.

External Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)

External DCR is surgery that creates a new pathway for tears to drain from the eye when the tear duct is blocked. The surgeon will make a small incision near the inside corner of the eye. He or she will then create a new opening directly from the eye’s lacrimal sack into the nasal cavity to allow tears to drain. A surgical adhesive or stitches are used to close the incision and a tubelike stent may be used temporarily to keep the new drain from closing up while healing. The tube can be removed later in the physician’s office or outpatient surgery center.

Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)

Endoscopic DCR surgically creates a new pathway for tears to drain from the eye when the tear duct is blocked. The surgeon will insert a slender tube called an endoscope into your nasal cavity. He or she will then create a new opening directly from the eyes lacrimal sack into the nasal cavity to allow tears to drain. A flexible tube called a stent may be put in place temporarily to keep the new drain from closing up while healing. The tube can be removed later in the physician’s office or outpatient surgery center.

Community Eye Center offers treatment options for blocked tear ducts, including External and Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR).

Community Eye Center Oculoplastic Surgeon, Dr. Mishra

A talented and sought-after licensed Cosmetic and Oculoplastic Surgeon with board certification in Anti-aging Medicine. Dr. Mishra offers a comprehensive array of treatments, including cosmetic and functional eyelid surgery, BOTOX, cosmetic and other options at Community Eye Center.

Read More About Oculoplastics & Cosmetics

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Photo Of Woman Wearing Glasses With Blue Frames

Financing For Cosmetic, Oculoplastics and Eyelid Surgery

Many private health insurance plans will cover the cost of functional eyelid surgery; this procedure may also be covered under Medicare. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose an elective procedure, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance.

Read More »
Person On Operating Table At Community Eye Center's St. Lucy Eye Surgery Center, Smiling With Nurses Standing Nearby To Review

Entropion & Ectropion Repair

Community Eye Center offers Southwest Florida with the best oculoplastic, cosmetic and plastic surgery, including treatment of common eyelid malposition, entropion and ectropion repair.

Read More »
Photo Of A Woman With Blonde Eye Brows Holding Her Fingers To Her Eyes To Simulate An Eye Lift Procedure

Cosmetic Treatments, Oculofacial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Community Eye Center offers oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery options for patients with cosmetic, functional or reconstructive surgery needs. Our board-certified cosmetic and oculoplastic surgeon, Dr. Mishra, has extensive training and years of experience focused on plastic and reconstructive eye surgery. Dr. Mishra will customize and tailor your treatment plan. With attentive care, he strives to meet your goals with results that look not only beautiful but also natural.

Read More »
A Doctor Holding A Woman's Eyelid Up While Tracing The Area For Eyelift Surgery Incision

Eyelid Lift Surgery (Blepharoplasty)

Eyelift surgery, also known as eyelid surgery or blepharoplasty, is a surgical procedure that is performed to remove excess skin from the upper eyelids and/or reduce bagginess from lower eyelids.

This procedure is done for both cosmetic and functional reasons. While it can improve appearances, it is also done to improve sight for those whose eyelids sag and get in the way of their vision.

Read More »

Glaucoma Treatment Options

Treatment options for glaucoma include eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. When treating glaucoma, the goal is to prevent vision loss, as the disease is progressive and vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. When glaucoma is detected early, it is drastically more manageable; and with proper medical treatment, most people will not lose their sight.

There are many medications that can be prescribed to prevent vision-threatening damage. Discussing all of the potential side effects and finding the right treatment or combination of treatments for each patient, the doctors at Community Eye Center work as a team with their patients in the battle against glaucoma.

Surgical Glaucoma Treatment Options

If medications alone do not achieve the desired results or have intolerable side effects, our doctors may suggest surgery for glaucoma management.

Trabecular Bypass Stent Surgery

To implant a trabecular bypass stent, your ophthalmologist will create a small incision in your cornea. Then he or she will place a stent, which looks like a tiny tube, into part of the eye’s drainage system. The stent allows fluid to bypass an area that is not draining efficiently. This reduces eye pressure.

Laser Trabeculoplasty

With laser trabeculoplasty, your surgeon will put a special contact lens on your eye. This helps focus and deliver the light from the laser to the precise location. The surgeon applies the low energy laser to the area called the trabecular meshwork; this is where fluid naturally drains from the eye. The laser causes microscopic changes in the eye’s tissue allowing fluid to drain better, reducing eye pressure.

Implant Surgery

In glaucoma implant surgery, the drainage implant is usually placed in the area under either the upper or lower eyelid. Your ophthalmologist will stitch the implant to the sclera, the white part of your eye. Your ophthalmologist may cover the tube of the implant with a patch. Fluid will drain out to the area around the implant. A tiny tube is attached to the drainage implant and inserted into the front chamber of the eye, usually just in front of the iris. The tube sends fluid from the inside of the eye to the implant where it is absorbed into the body.

Laser Iridotomy

With laser iridotomy, the ophthalmologist uses a focused beam of light to create a tiny opening about the size of a pinhead in the iris; this opening allows trapped fluid behind the iris to flow into the front of the eye, usually reducing pressure. A laser iridotomy is an important way to treat or prevent a sudden rise in eye pressure that can seriously affect your eyesight.

Mini Filtration Implants

In mini filtration implant surgery, your ophthalmologist will create a small flap underneath the upper eyelid in the sclera, the white part of your eye. Then he or she will implant a tiny drainage device under the flap. This device is called a mini shunt, which opens a pathway for fluid to drain from inside the eye. The fluid collects in an area around the implant caused a filtering bleb, where it is gradually absorbed into the body.

Trabeculectomy

During trabeculectomy surgery, your ophthalmologist makes a tiny incision in the conjunctiva, the clear lining over the sclera (or the white part of the eye); this is done under your upper eyelid and near the edge of the iris. Next, he or she will create a small flap in the sclera underneath the incision. Then, a tiny piece of tissue is removed under the flap to make an opening into the eye. A small piece of the iris may also be removed to keep it from blocking the opening. This opening serves as a new channel for fluid to drain gradually from the eye, reducing pressure. The flap is sewn back into place with tiny stitches, which help guard against too much fluid draining out at once. The area where the fluid drains from the trabeculectomy is called a filtering bleb. As fluid filters out of the eye and into the bleb, it looks like a bubble. Because the bleb is under the eyelid, it is not usually visible.

Community Eye Center Doctors

Community Eye Center offers comprehensive eye care from multiple South West Florida locations.

Read More About Glaucoma & Glaucoma Treatment Options

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

Glaucoma Informational Video

In the healthy eye, fluid called aqueous humour is made in the front of the eye and flows out through a tiny drain called the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is located in an area called the drainage angle. If fluid does not flow out of the drainage angle properly, eye pressure increases and damages the optic nerve.

Read More »
A photo showing how if the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Closed Angle Glaucoma

If the drainage angle is too narrow for fluid to flow out of the eye properly, pressure increases. Eventually the pathway for fluid to flow out of they eye may become completely blocked.

Read More »

Types Of Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma, the most common form of the disease, occurs when the eye’s drainage canals become clogged over time, resulting in increased eye pressure that causes damage to the eye’s optic nerve.

Read More »

Glaucoma Treatment Options

Treatment options for glaucoma include eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. When treating glaucoma, the goal is to prevent vision loss, as the disease is progressive and vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. When glaucoma is detected early, it is drastically more manageable; and with proper medical treatment, most people will not lose their sight.

Read More »

Recovery After Cataract Surgery

Play Video

Cataract surgeries are typically quick and uneventful. An estimated 3.5 million cataract surgeries are performed each year in the United States. It is one of the most common surgical procedures. Numbers also show that the chance of a good outcome and improved vision after surgery are excellent.

What to Expect During Recovery

A typical cataract removal often happens in under 15 minutes. These surgeries are generally performed in an outpatient setting, such as St. Lucy’s Outpatient Eye Surgery Center. However, patients will need to spend a short time in the recovery area until the effects of sedation or anesthesia wear off.

If a patient needs cataract surgery in both eyes, the surgeon will typically wait at least a few days to a couple of weeks for the first eye to recover before operating on the second eye.

After cataract surgery, patients will need someone to drive them home. They will be given a pair of sunglasses to wear on the ride to protect their eyes from the light.

Although patients should rest following surgery, typically within the first few hours, patients should be able to:

  • Perform computer work
  • Watch television
  • Showering and bathing (following doctors instructions)

Upon arriving home, patients might be tired and want to lie down to rest. Depending on the doctor’s advice, patients may be able to remove the protective shield that is placed over the eye within hours of the procedure.

Patients will need to tape the shield back over the eye at night or during naps, for protection during recovery- at least for several days.

Immediately after removing the eye shield, patients may experience cloudy or blurred vision. It can take time for vision to adjust to the cataract removal and adapt to the intraocular lens that replaced the eye’s natural lens.

For the first week or so, patients may experience red and bloodshot eyes because of temporary blood vessel damage on the eye’s sclera (white of the eye). As the eye heals, this should go away.

If anesthesia injections were received through the skin into the lower eye, patients might notice some bruising. This may appear similar to a black eye. This should fade within the first few days.

Often, people report clearer vision within hours. Within days, most people resume their normal day-to-day activities. However, each patient heals differently. For example, patients with pre-existing medical conditions, such as macular degeneration, glaucoma and corneal problems, may find it takes a little longer to see clearly.

Antibiotic eye drops are typically prescribed for patients to prevent infection. Additionally, anti-inflammatory eye drops may also be prescribed to reduce internal inflammation. It is essential that patients apply these eye drops according to the eye doctor’s instruction.

Typically, patients are seen the day after the procedure to confirm that there are no complications. If patients do not notice an improvement in blurry vision or have eye pain or discomfort in the days after this visit, they should report this to their surgeon.

Acetaminophen might be prescribed during a patient’s recovery. Although, patients typically only have mild discomfort after cataract surgery.

Patients are regularly surprised at how good they feel and how quickly they can resume normal activities – some even the day after cataract surgery.

Although a patient might feel well enough for activity, it is important to be cautious during recovery. This will help to avoid developing an infection or injury while the eye heals.

Full cataract surgery recovery should be complete within a month when eyes are completely healed.

The best cataract surgery recoveries are achieved by following your surgeon’s detailed instructions post surgery.

Community Eye Center Cataract Surgeons

Community Eye Center offers treatment and diagnosis for cataracts as well as multiple surgery options, including premium lens implants. Community Eye Center's cataract surgeons are board-certified and dedicated to providing patients with excellence in eye care.

Read More About Cataracts & Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information on the internet about eye health. The best information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor. Call (941) 625-1325 to book a consult with one of Community Eye Center’s ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians today.

A Loving Couple Who Choose To Look Into Each Others' Eyes

Types of Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

There is a lot of information about cataract surgery lens choices on the internet. The best and most up-to-date information will come directly from a board-certified eye doctor.

Community Eye Center (CEC) is ophthalmology, optometry, optical in multiple Southwest Florida locations with its own AAAHC accredited eye-only surgery center.

Read More »
Providing Excellence In Care For Patients At Community Eye Center's Eye-Only Surgery Center, Dr. Michael A. Baskind, CRNA, PhD Stands Next To A Patient In A Post Cataract Surgery Recovery Room

Recovery After Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgeries are typically quick and uneventful. An estimated 3.5 million cataract removals are performed each year in the United States. It is one of the most common surgical procedures. Numbers also show that the chance of a good outcome and improved vision after surgery are excellent.

Read More »
Voted The Best Cataract Surgeon In The Area, Dr. Spadafora Performs A Cataract Surgery On A Patient At Community Eye Center's Eye-Only Surgery Center

About Cataract Surgery

Ophthalmologists, optometrists and eye health professionals work as a team to provide comprehensive eye care at Community Eye Center (CEC). Eye specialists including, cataract, glaucoma, retina and oculoplastics as well as an accredited eye only surgery center, CEC offers the best cataract surgery options possible for positive patient outcomes. Eye doctors may be seen at any of CEC’s multiple Florida locations in Port Charlotte, North Port, and Venice.

Read More »
An Eye-Only Surgery Center, Eye Clinic and Optical Shop, Community Eye Center Offers Patients, Like The One Smiling At The Camera, With Comprehensive Eye Care Including Treatment For Macular Degeneration, Cataracts, Glaucoma And More

Financial Assistance For Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is generally covered under insurance and Medicare plans. But, in the case that a procedure is not covered, or if you choose to upgrade your surgery to one of our elective procedures, such as a premium lens choice, Community Eye Center (CEC) partners with organizations that offer financial assistance for cataract surgery.

Read More »

Laser-Guided Cataract Surgery

Community Eye Center performs Laser-Guided Cataract Surgery. Dr. Schaible and Dr. Spadafora conducted research with a form of YAG laser in human cataract surgery more than a decade ago for the FDA.

Read More »

Premium Lens Choices With Cataract Surgery

In the past, cataract surgery used to be about preventing blindness; however, with the sophisticated advances in cataract removal, premium lens choices and ORA laser-guided cataract surgery, surgeons can return a patient’s vision to the way it was years ago.

Read More »

Pay Your Bill Online

 
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center
  • community eye center